Darin Janssen’s Weblog

Notebook software and online teaching

My first online teaching experience went pretty well.  I did not rehearse what I was going to say much before so I spent a lot of time stumbling and say “uhh”.  It looked at the experience as a test experience before our March online teaching, so I can live with it.  Some things I have learned are:

1. I have problems following the chat and talking at the same time.  With more experience teaching online, I should get better at this.

2. I need to practice and plan more of what I am going to say so I do not stumble as much.

3. Rather then having people typing questions in the chat while I am talking I should ask people to put up their “elluminate hand” and address questions that way.  But with practice and more online teaching I may not have to worry about this because I should get better at reading the chat while talking.

During my portion of the elluminate session I use the recorder built into Notebook software to record my teaching.  I am quite happy with how it worked.  With the notebook recorder you have a few different options for recording.  You can record your entire desktop (which I did), a window, or draw a rectangle around a certain section of your screen you would like to record.  I will be using the recorder to make a screen cast of how to upload onto slideshare for Jordan and my collaborative project.  The recorder worked very well to record the desktop and the voice from my mic.  The only downfall I found was that it did not record the audio from the elluminate session.  In the last 45 seconds of my recording Dean is talking and I did not stop the recording because I wanted what he was saying in the recording.  His voice did not record so the video ends with 45 seconds of silence.  I do not know if I can change a setting or something to record the audio off the desktop; that is something I have to check into further.

There are two other uses for the notebook recorder.  One is to pre-record a lesson or video to play for student; either when a sub is in your class, or if you are in a split class you can play a recording for one grade while you work with the other grade.  Another use is to record your smartboard lesson while you are doing it.  This is a great option for reviewing or playing for students who missed the class.  This works much the same as recording the elluminate sessions.

In the making of my slides, I used shots of part of my screen (iTunes and my Google reader).  For this I used the capture tool in notebook.  Notebook screen capture tool can be used to capture an image of an entire screen, part of a screen, draw a box around something (which I used), or an irregular line around something (eg. someone’s face).  When the capture is made it is put into a slide in notebook, which you can copy and paste, and use like any other image.

Both the recorder and the capture tool are both tools which are bonus parts of the notebook software.  You can watch the recording of my online teaching below.

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February 27, 2010 - Posted by | ECMP 455, school | , , ,

2 Comments »

  1. Hi Darin, Congrats on your first online session. It does take some practice to get used to talking and monitoring the chat at the same time. Your idea to have participants raise their hands for questions is a good alternative. You can also turn off chat while you are presenting and turn on again for a QA period. Not sure why you did not use the recording functionality on Elluminate. This records the entire session, including audio.

    Keep on Elluminating!

    – Beth, Elluminate Goddess of Communication (AKA Sr. Mgr. Corp. Communications)

    Comment by Beth | March 1, 2010

  2. Hi Beth, The entire class was recorded by my professor, I just chose to record my part of the lesson for two reasons: one to have my section of the elluminate sessions recorded for myself and two so that I could use the recorder from notebook software. Thank you for letting me know that I could turn off the chat; I did not know that was an option. I have been in a few elluminate sessions, but until this session I have always been a participant. Thanks for reading my post.

    Comment by Darin Janssen | March 1, 2010


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